Chris Fendrick headshot. Man wearing shirt and tie, smiling.

[Editor’s Note: The following post comes from Chris Fendrick, a fellow in the Centennial Cohort of the Blind Leaders Development Program, and the second of a two-parter. His first entry describes the program; Part 2 recaps the AFB Leadership Conference.]

Chris Fendrick headshot. Man wearing shirt and tie, smiling.

[Editor’s Note: The following post comes from Chris Fendrick, a fellow in the Centennial Cohort of the Blind Leaders Development Program, and is Part 1 of a two-parter.]

Alice smiling, wearing shades and fish-shaped earings. Dark blonde hair pulled back and wearing a blouse.

[Editor’s Note: The following post comes from Laurie Alice Eakes, a mentor in the Centennial Cohort of the Blind Leaders Development Program.]

Man in a military uniform walking with a long mobility cane holding his small daughter's hand This year and every year, the American Foundation for the Blind wants to take a moment to give tremendous thanks to the veterans who so selflessly have defended and protected our country with honor and pride. Thank you for your service.

Marc Safman headshot. A man in a gray suit and glasses, smiling. Marc Safman is a fellow in the Blind Leaders Development Program Centennial Cohort. Marc is deafblind and has experience as a paralegal specializing in anti-money laundering compliance and litigation.

Melanie Peskoe, a woman with bobbed-short brown hair wearing a green top. One of the first questions people ask one another is, “What do you do for a living?” That question has such deep implications for most of us. Our jobs can be closely tied to who we are and what we value. What we do for work tells the world a lot about us: It can indicate our level of education or give an idea about someone’s personality. We often associate our self-worth with our careers.